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Word of the Day: COCOON

The word for today is: COCOON.

MEANING:

  • A covering usually made of silk which some insects (such as caterpillars) make around themselves to protect them while they grow.
  • Something that covers or protects a person or thing.
  • To cover or protect (someone or something) completely.
  • To spend time at home instead of going out for other activities.

EXAMPLES:

  • The child was wrapped in a cocoon of blankets.
  • The celebrity was surrounded by a protective cocoon of bodyguards.
  • Nigerians are spending more time cocooning at home in recent years.

SYNONYMS:

  • Armor, case, cover, covering.
  • Bosom, bower, circumfuse, enfold, embosom, embower, embrace, enclose (also inclose), encompass, enshroud, enswathe, envelop, enwrap, invest, involve, lap, mantle, muffle, shroud, swathe, veil, wrap.

ANTONYMS:

  • None

HISTORY:

  • Origin is French “cocon”, from “Occitan coucoun”.
  • Also from Latin “coccum kermes” (thought to be a gall or berry).
  • Its first usage was recorded 1679.

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Word of the Day: COMEUPPANCE

The word for today is COMEUPPANCE.

MEANING:

  • A punishment someone deserve to receive.
  • The result of a good/bad that is well deserved.

EXAMPLES:

  • Sooner or later, he’ll get his comeuppance for bullying other students.
  • The superhero was terrific at ensuring the bad guys get their comeuppance.
  • One of these days, our politicians will get their comeuppance.

SYNONYMS:

  • Wrath, nemesis,deserts, penalty, punishment.

ANTONYMS:

None

HISTORY:

  • This word’s first known usage was in 1859.

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Word of the Day: GLITCH

The word for today is: GLITCH.

MEANING:

  • An unexpected and usually minor problem.
  • A minor malfunction with a machine or device (computer or phone).
  • A minor problem that causes a temporary setback.
  • A false electronic signal.

EXAMPLE:

  • A glitch in a spacecraft’s fuel cell.
  • Glitches in the lecturer’s schedule caused some delays.
  • A technical glitch caused a temporary shutdown yesterday.

SYNONYMS:

  • Snag, bug.

ANTONYMS:

  • None.

HISTORY:

  • The word was traced and originated from “glitshn” (zikh) which means “to slide” or “to glide”.
  • First use was in 1958.

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Word of the Day: ACCOLADE

The word for today is: ACCOLADE.

MEANING:

  • A mark of acknowledgment or award an expression of praise.
  • A ceremonial embrace.
  • A brace or a line used in music to join two or more staffs carrying simultaneous parts.

EXAMPLE:

  • Mr. Kodunmi received the highest accolade of his profession.
  • His girlfriend deserves a accolade for enduring his maltreatment.
  • This movie has drawn accolades from both fans and critics.
  • There is no any higher accolade at this school than an honorary degree.
  • For their exceptional bravery, the firefighters received accolades from both local and national officials.

SYNONYMS:

  • Encomium, citation, commendation, dithyramb, eulogium, eulogy, homage, hymn, paean, panegyric, salutation, tribute.

ANTONYMS:

  • Rebuke, indictment, reprimand, reproof, censure, condemnation, denunciation.
  • Sermon, lecture, harangue, admonition, correction.

HISTORY:

  • This word means “embrace”.
  • It was borrowed from a Middle French word “acoler” meaning “to embrace”.
  • Its first known usage was dated 1591.

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Word of the Day: SLAKE

The word for today is: SLAKE

MEANING:

  • To provide, do, or have what is required.
  • Archaic: subside, abate, crumble, moderate.
  • To cause (a substance) to heat and crumble by treatment with water.
  • Satisfy, quench.

EXAMPLE:

  • Trying to slake his curiosity.
  • The cold water slaked his thirst.
  • Hanging out with you has never slacked my love for adventure.

SYNONYMS:

  • Assuage, quench, sate, satiate, satisfy.

ANTONYMS:

  • Arouse, excite, pique, stimulate, tantalize, tease.

HISTORY:

  • This word is from an old English “slacian” from “sleac” slack.
  • Its first usage was traced back to 14 century.

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Word of the Day: REGNANT

The word for today is: REGNANT

MEANING:

  • Exercise power or authority.
  • Exercising rule (reigning).
  • Having the most power (dominant).
  • Of common or widespread occurrence.

EXAMPLE:

  • He was inaugurated as the regnant Regina of his royalty and realm.
  • All form of negotiation is leading no where except in vital association with regnant obedience.

SYNONYMS:

  • Predominant, prevalent, reigning, ruling, sovereign, widespread.

ANTONYMS:

None

HISTORY:

  • This word was developed from a Latin word “regnans”, “regnare” meaning “to rule” or “to reign”.
  • Its first usage was traced back to the 15th century (1590-1600).

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Word of the Day: EMBEZZLE

The word for today is: EMBEZZLE

MEANING:

  • Steal money that you have been trusted with.
  • To take for selfish reasons in violation of trust.
  • To appropriate (something, such as property entrusted to one’s care) fraudulently to one’s own use.

EXAMPLE:

  • The company’s senior accounts manager embezzled one thousand dollars ($1,000) from her employer by way of a loophole in the accounting procedures.
  • The politician absconded with embezzled public fund.

SYNONYMS:

  • Thieve, steal, rob ,swipe, misapply, convert, take over, defalcate, peculate.

ANTONYMS:

  • Give, return, hand over.

HISTORY:

  • The word “embesilen” is a late Middle English and it was derived from an Anglo-French word “embeseiller” which means “to destroy” or “make away with”.
  • Em + baseiller means “to destroy” or “to steal” or “to plunder”.
  • The first usage to this word was traced back to the 15th century. In another research it says between the year 1375 – 1425.

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Word of the Day: EVINCE

The word for today is: EVINCE

MEANING:

  • To constitute outward evidence.
  • To reveal or display.

EXAMPLE:

  • They have never evinced any readiness or ability to negotiate.
  • The teenager caught shoplifting seemed to evince no remorse.

SYNONYMS:

  • Convince, reveal, show, express.
  • Make clear, make plain, make obvious, make manifest.
  • Indicate, display, exhibit, demonstrate.
  • Attest to, testify to, bear witness to.

ANTONYMS:

  • Conceal, hide, keep hidden.

HISTORY:

  • The word evince originated from a Latin word “evincere” which means “To vanquish” or “Win a point”.
  • The word “Vincere” also means “To conquer”.
  • The first known usage of this word is in the year “1604”.

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Word of the Day: ADDLEPATED

The word for today is: ADDLEPATED

DEFINITION:

  • Being mixed up: confused.
  • Eccentric.

EXAMPLES:

  • Her addlepated mind flitted butterfly like from one often unrelated subject to another.
  • Blathering like the addlepated nincompoop that you are.

SYNONYMS:

  • Addlebrained, muddleheaded, puddingheaded, confused

ANTONYMS:

  • Clear headed, unperplexed, organized

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Word of the Day: DEMEANOUR

The word for today is: DEMEANOUR

MEANING: 

  • Outward behaviour or bearing.

EXAMPLES:

  • His happy demeanour.
  • The woman has a peaceful demeanour

SYNONYMS:

  • Manner, air, attitude, appearance, look, aspect, mien, cast.

ANTONYM:

  • Mannerless.

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